Irish Variable Mortgage Rates Double EU Average

by Frank O’Rourke

mortgage_rates

Despite numerous Government pledges to tackle the issue of high variable mortgage rates, variable rates here are still nearly double the Euro area average, according to local Fianna Fail Deputy, Frank O’Rourke.

“According to the recent Central Bank figures, the average interest rate on new mortgages in September of this year stood at 3.31%; this is nearly double the equivalent rate across the Euro area, which stood at 1.86%.”

“Mortgage rates in Ireland remain dramatically out of line with rates charged elsewhere in Europe, and we must ensure that this is addressed. We have pressed for the extension of mortgage relief for those who bought their home during the peak of the boom, however, we must now focus on the variable rate that is being charged by Irish banks. ”

“This means that a borrower with a mortgage of €200,000 is paying around €250 per month more than they would be paying in the average Euro area country.”

“In May 2016, a Fianna Fáil Bill designed to give the Central Bank powers to tackle excessive variable mortgage rates passed second stage in the Dáil. The progress of the Bill through the legislative process has been tortuous and painfully slow. Despite not opposing the Bill at second stage, it is abundantly clear the Government does not want the Bill to become law. We will continue to press for this Bill to be passed.”

“Putting €250 per month back into families will help the local economy, bring down the cost of living and ease wage inflation pressure. I see again this weekend that Fine Gael are trying to make a priority of reducing the top rate of tax, as opposed to focusing on the cost of living for people. Focus on reducing the cost of living will bring a multitudes of benefits to our local economy and hard pressed families that have mortgages,” concluded Deputy O’Rourke.

Hospital beds out of action due to staff shortages in Naas General Hospital

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James Lawless Naas general hospitalAt a time of major overcrowding crisis in our Emergency Departments, it is simply mind boggling that there is hundreds of hospital beds closed in the health service. In Naas General Hospital there are staff shortages reducing the capacity of inpatient hospital beds. 172 beds were lost to the health system for a variety of reasons. Worryingly 33% of the bed closures were as a direct result of staff shortages. In our own hospital in Naas there are currently two beds down due to staff shortages.

Despite a lot of hot hair from successive Fine Gael Health Ministers, little or no progress has been made in stemming the flow of nursing and medical graduates out of the Irish health system, and even less progress made on attracting those professionals who emigrated from Ireland.

We have on average 400-500 people lying on trolleys every night of the year in our Emergency Departments across the country; yet there are nearly 200 beds out of action, and not being used to allow patients to be admitted to hospitals. Just last night in Naas General Hospital there were 17 people waiting on trollies in the Emergency Department.

There are a large number of beds taken out of use regularly to allow for refurbishment and repair.

I don’t understand why beds are not transferred to the many un-opened hospital wards to ensure that there is no reduction in bed capacity.

89 beds lost nationwide because of refurbishment is a scandal. There are elderly people lying on trolleys for hours on end, sometimes days, and there health and well-being is being damaged.

Minister Harris must finalise and publish the Bed Capacity Review, and outline his plans to reduce the number of closed beds.

For as long as there are sick people lying on trollies in our Emergency Departments, there can be no acceptance for unnecessary bed closures. It’s immoral, in my view, and it must be dealt with as a priority,” concluded Deputy Lawless.at a time of major overcrowding crisis in our Emergency Departments, it is simply mind boggling that there is hundreds of hospital beds closed in the health service. In Naas General Hospital there are staff shortages reducing the capacity of inpatient hospital beds.

172 beds were lost to the health system for a variety of reasons. Worryingly 33% of the bed closures were as a direct result of staff shortages. In our own hospital in Naas there are currently two beds down due to staff shortages.

Despite a lot of hot hair from successive Fine Gael Health Ministers, little or no progress has been made in stemming the flow of nursing and medical graduates out of the Irish health system, and even less progress made on attracting those professionals who emigrated from Ireland.

We have on average 400-500 people lying on trolleys every night of the year in our Emergency Departments across the country; yet there are nearly 200 beds out of action, and not being used to allow patients to be admitted to hospitals. Just last night in Naas General Hospital there were 17 people waiting on trollies in the Emergency Department.

There are a large number of beds taken out of use regularly to allow for refurbishment and repair.

I don’t understand why beds are not transferred to the many un-opened hospital wards to ensure that there is no reduction in bed capacity.

89 beds lost nationwide because of refurbishment is a scandal. There are elderly people lying on trolleys for hours on end, sometimes days, and there health and well-being is being damaged.

Minister Harris must finalise and publish the Bed Capacity Review, and outline his plans to reduce the number of closed beds.

For as long as there are sick people lying on trollies in our Emergency Departments, there can be no acceptance for unnecessary bed closures. It’s immoral, in my view, and it must be dealt with as a priority.

Cllr. Lawless Lodges Submission Against Maighne Wind Farm

Cllr Lawless and Cllr Ward Inspect Mount Lucas Wind Farm

Cllr Lawless and Cllr Ward Inspect Mount Lucas Wind Farm

Cllr James Lawless has lodged his submission in objection to the proposed Maighne Wind Farm in North West Kildare this week. The submission to An Bord Pleanála comes as over 1000 families across Kildare submit their concerns. The 47x167m turbines are set to damage house prices, tourism, and the local economy if built. Cllr Lawless was one of the first councillors in Kildare to raise concerns about the Maighne Wind Farm at council level calling for a planning moratorium until the new planning guidelines were in place.

Submitting his objections this week Cllr Lawless cited “the premature nature of the building of the proposed wind farm given Kildare County Council are currently drawing up wind energy project guidelines and at government level a public consultation is still underway”.

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Ben Doyle Picked for Election in Maynooth Area

Ben Doyle has been selected to run for Fianna Fáil in the Maynooth area. A Peace Commissioner appointed by the Department of Justice, Ben lives in Carbury with his wife and two children.

He has worked tirelessly in the Carbury area over the past few years on issues such as unfinished housing estates in Derrinturn, lack of amenities for children and is presently working on bringing a new Enterprise Unit to the North West Kildare area. He is especially proud of his involvement in the establishment of an Autistic Unit in St. Conleaths’ local primary school.

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Fitzpatrick and Ó Cearúil Selected as Candidates for Maynooth Electoral Area

L-R: Declan Brennan, Senator Mark Daly, Naoise Ó Cearúil, Darragh Fitzpatrick, Gerard Smith

Fianna Fáil has selected two candidates to contest next year’s local elections in the redrawn Maynooth local electoral area.

At a selection convention that took place at Kilcock GAA on Tuesday 1st October Darragh Fitzpatrick and Naoise Ó Cearúil were selected to contest the election, which will take place next May.

The new Maynooth local electoral area covers an area including Maynooth town as well as Kilcock, Clane, Prosperous, Johnstown Bridge and Carbury.

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